The End of Art? -Op, Pop and Conceptual Art-

-Op, Pop and conceptual art-

 

Bridget Riley

– fall 1963

-swirly lines

– monochromatic

– physical response created

– all about perception

– depth, it looks three-dimensional due to the waves formed through the optical swirled lines.

 

Op Art

Timescale: late 1950’s- 60’s

Concerns and themes:

-Geometric abstract art

– Creates illusion of movement

– Uses theories from psychology of perception

– Physical response

– big influence on fashion

Main artists:

– Bridget Riley, Josef Albers, Jesus-Rafael sotto, Vicor Vasarely

 

What is popular culture?

… it includes Tv, music, Films, Fashion form

 

The rise of the teenagers…

There was no distinct difference between parents and children until now.

 

Victor Vasarely – untitled 1963

– Not as many lines

– same width

– Not curved

– Geometric

– Shapes made with lines

 

Sotto untitled 1959

– a Mix of painting and sculpture

– Kinetic art- viewer moving around makes the movement

– new technologies allowing it to happen

 

Richard Hamilton

Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? 1956

– materials: photography, collage cut outs

– saturated collage

– included new technology like old tape players, hoover, tv, bill boards, theatre

– end of rationing

– packaging design

– advertising posters

– moon landing ceiling

– mass production

– ford first cars

 

Pop Art

Timescale: late 1950’s-60’s

Themes and concerns:

– celebration of modern consumerism after Austerity of the war years

– brash colourful world of advertising, comic strips and popular entertainment

– popular (designed for mass audience), transient, expendable, low cost, mass produced, young, witty, sexy, gimmicky, glamorous, big buisness (Hamilton definition)

Main artists:

– Andy Warhol, Blake, Hockney, Lichtenstein, Hamilton

 

Peter Blake

 cover art 1967

– bright

-iconic

– brash colours

– glamorous celebrities

– Popular culture

– collage

-Rock n’ Roll

– Fine art and pop combined

 

Andy warhol

Marilyn Monroe 

– screen prints- handmade

– depression

– colours are bright and represent a glamorous star

– different colours, tones, faded- fading away may infer the journey to her death

– black and white side could infer depression meds

 

Lichenstein

Whaam 1963

– pop culture to draw in teenagers

-comic

-bright

– colours- primary

 

Conceptual Art

– from Duchamp to the present-

 

Sol LeWitt

Five open geometric structures 1979

-self referential in the way it refers to itself (is what it says it is)

– minimal with concept

– the idea of the piece is the most important thing

 

Timescale: mid 1950’s and ongoing

Various media- but the IDEA is the main focus

Influenced by:

– Dada ready-made

– Fluxus

– Minimalism

Main artists:

– Joseph Buys, Sol LeWitt, Robert Smithson, Lawrence Weiner, Joseph Kosuth

Themes and concerns:

– concept before object

– Art work can exist as an idea- a work of art is not dependent on the object/work itself

-direct defiance of art market- destroy the idea of value

– art need not take any physical form at all

– self conscious and self referential- they created art that is about art

 

Sol LeWitt

Wall Drawing #1136 2004

-sold idea with instructions and therefore not made by the artist but more the concept of the design idea

– therefore with instructions cannot be the same as what the artist had thought with the idea and is different every time it’s done

 

Joseph Kosuth

One and three chairs 1965

– Photograph of the chair, Chair, Definition of the chair- You need all 3 to make a chair and that was the idea of one and three chairs. A clever concept on an everyday object

 

Review:

Op art-

… Manipulates views visual response, physical response, stark contrast, links with kinetic art

 

Pop Art-

… Roots in history of modern art, industrialisation, deals with contemporary life; urban, mass production.

 

Conceptual Art-

… The idea is more important than the art. Defiance of ‘Art Market’ and a reaction to abstract expressionism. Art can be made by others. 

 

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