The End of Art? -Op, Pop and Conceptual Art-

-Op, Pop and conceptual art-

 

Bridget Riley

– fall 1963

-swirly lines

– monochromatic

– physical response created

– all about perception

– depth, it looks three-dimensional due to the waves formed through the optical swirled lines.

 

Op Art

Timescale: late 1950’s- 60’s

Concerns and themes:

-Geometric abstract art

– Creates illusion of movement

– Uses theories from psychology of perception

– Physical response

– big influence on fashion

Main artists:

– Bridget Riley, Josef Albers, Jesus-Rafael sotto, Vicor Vasarely

 

What is popular culture?

… it includes Tv, music, Films, Fashion form

 

The rise of the teenagers…

There was no distinct difference between parents and children until now.

 

Victor Vasarely – untitled 1963

– Not as many lines

– same width

– Not curved

– Geometric

– Shapes made with lines

 

Sotto untitled 1959

– a Mix of painting and sculpture

– Kinetic art- viewer moving around makes the movement

– new technologies allowing it to happen

 

Richard Hamilton

Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? 1956

– materials: photography, collage cut outs

– saturated collage

– included new technology like old tape players, hoover, tv, bill boards, theatre

– end of rationing

– packaging design

– advertising posters

– moon landing ceiling

– mass production

– ford first cars

 

Pop Art

Timescale: late 1950’s-60’s

Themes and concerns:

– celebration of modern consumerism after Austerity of the war years

– brash colourful world of advertising, comic strips and popular entertainment

– popular (designed for mass audience), transient, expendable, low cost, mass produced, young, witty, sexy, gimmicky, glamorous, big buisness (Hamilton definition)

Main artists:

– Andy Warhol, Blake, Hockney, Lichtenstein, Hamilton

 

Peter Blake

 cover art 1967

– bright

-iconic

– brash colours

– glamorous celebrities

– Popular culture

– collage

-Rock n’ Roll

– Fine art and pop combined

 

Andy warhol

Marilyn Monroe 

– screen prints- handmade

– depression

– colours are bright and represent a glamorous star

– different colours, tones, faded- fading away may infer the journey to her death

– black and white side could infer depression meds

 

Lichenstein

Whaam 1963

– pop culture to draw in teenagers

-comic

-bright

– colours- primary

 

Conceptual Art

– from Duchamp to the present-

 

Sol LeWitt

Five open geometric structures 1979

-self referential in the way it refers to itself (is what it says it is)

– minimal with concept

– the idea of the piece is the most important thing

 

Timescale: mid 1950’s and ongoing

Various media- but the IDEA is the main focus

Influenced by:

– Dada ready-made

– Fluxus

– Minimalism

Main artists:

– Joseph Buys, Sol LeWitt, Robert Smithson, Lawrence Weiner, Joseph Kosuth

Themes and concerns:

– concept before object

– Art work can exist as an idea- a work of art is not dependent on the object/work itself

-direct defiance of art market- destroy the idea of value

– art need not take any physical form at all

– self conscious and self referential- they created art that is about art

 

Sol LeWitt

Wall Drawing #1136 2004

-sold idea with instructions and therefore not made by the artist but more the concept of the design idea

– therefore with instructions cannot be the same as what the artist had thought with the idea and is different every time it’s done

 

Joseph Kosuth

One and three chairs 1965

– Photograph of the chair, Chair, Definition of the chair- You need all 3 to make a chair and that was the idea of one and three chairs. A clever concept on an everyday object

 

Review:

Op art-

… Manipulates views visual response, physical response, stark contrast, links with kinetic art

 

Pop Art-

… Roots in history of modern art, industrialisation, deals with contemporary life; urban, mass production.

 

Conceptual Art-

… The idea is more important than the art. Defiance of ‘Art Market’ and a reaction to abstract expressionism. Art can be made by others. 

 

Visual Analysis- Pop Art

Title: Standard station 1966

Artist: Ed Ruscha 

Medium/ Technique: screenprint

Date accessed: 6/03/14

Reference: http://www.theartstory.org/movement-pop-art.htm Thursday 6th March 2014

This piece is a pop art movement due to it’s visual representation and communication, an american dream of optimism and naive that was going on at the time. In this way the piece looks like it’s a petrol station with it’s bright and bold colours. Around the time of this piece there was an anti vietnam war protest going on around the world. With the piece he wanted to blend the imagery of Hollywood with colourful renderings of commercial culture and the landscape of the southwest. This is one of his most iconic prints as he repeatedly used gasoline stations in his book Twentysix Gasoline Stations 1963, from a road trip through the American Southwestern countryside; trying to portray commercial culture. The perspective is flatterned as a composition to depict commercial advertising and leads from the far right to the top left leading the eye across to the foreground with one long leading line. He also used text within the piece to give interplay between art and text. The colour in the background is complementary blues and oranges, but also blends from orange to red as an analogous colour scheme making it look calm, warm and harmonious. He’s used the geometric shapes of the gasoline station through the windows, signs and gasoline tanks. The piece seems a smooth texture and feathery in the background.The image leaves the top right half spacious and the bottom left is filled with the gasoline station and the shapes it creates. It’s the way it presents the popular culture within the image that makes it the style of pop art.